Monday, April 17, 2006

The truly

faithful are a fearless lot.

Or maybe it's . . .

The truly fearless are a faithful lot.

2 Comments:

At 10:16 PM, Blogger oklahoma exile said...

The logic problem here involves the words truly and lot. Just because the truly faithful are a fearless lot does not mean that all fealrless lots are necessarily truly faithful. It may be some other type of fearless lot, e.g., one that has no faith at all. Or perhaps the lot is scared to death but has the courage to act in the face of it. So that could mean that the truly faithful are actually truly courageous. Then we could say that the truly faithful are a truly courageous lot. Again, though, not all truly courageous lots are necessarily truly faithful.

Thus, it does not necessarily follow that the truly fearless are a faithful lot, i.e., perhaps the truly fearless are, in fact, mentally ill, and don't have the sense to know they should be fearful. For instance, when a car cuts too close in front of you, the first reaction is usually -- IT'S A GREAT DAY TO DIE, MOTHER FUCKER -- when, actually, the action of the car almost causing you to wreck and perhaps die or at least ruin your car, has not angered you at all, rather, it has scared the **** out of you. But, being mentally ill, you think you are meerly angry and have acted fearlessly in calling out the great day to die, mother fucker statement. In that case, you may be a member of a faithful lot, though not necessarily the truly faithful, in thinking that you won't be caught at the other end of a double barrell but you are not fearless at all, much less truly.

So, I think, all you can really say is that the truly faithful are a faithful lot and the truly fearless are a fearless lot.

In closing, the operative words in our posting here are:
maybe
not necessarily

 
At 10:23 PM, Blogger ZebraDreaming said...

Cheese-us!!!!

 

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